2014 Schedule of Sales and Events!

It’s that time of the year again – the time when I have to predict the future and announce what plant sales and events we plan to be at. So here goes. Dates first for easy reading.

And don’t forget you can always specially request plants to be picked up at these events!!

March 15 – 16 – that’s this weekend! As always we kick things off with the Sequim Garden Show, a great local show that is worth the drive from outside the area, and timely if you have an early spring gardening bug to appease. This year I am hoping a large banner I ordered that says “WATER WISE PLANTS” will arrive in time and will draw more attention to our booth! We’ll see if it makes a difference.

After that I have four more weeks to get the nursery in gear for spring, which is a luxury I have not had the last few years. The Bloedel Reserve sale, which has been huge for us in the past, is not happening this year. I hate to say it but I am not really feeling too bad about that, since three major plant sales three consecutive weekends is VERY difficult & I always felt completely burned out by the end of it with the spring season still in full swing and demanding my attention.

April 12 – 13. So next it’s Hortlandia (Hardy Plant Society of Oregon) in Portland. This seems to be the Northwest’s biggest and best these days, worth the trip from Seattle! Some people even come from exotic far off places like California and Spokane.

April 18 – 19. Rhododendron Species Foundation sale in Federal Way, Washington.

May 3 – 4. Clackamas County Master Gardener Spring Fair, Canby, Oregon. This is a new one for us. Hey, we’ll try anything once!

May 17. Heronswood garden open and sale, Kingston.

May 30 – June 1. Spring OPEN HOUSE here at the nursery in Sequim!

July 12. Heronswood garden open and sale, Kingston.

July 25 – 26. Summer OPEN HOUSE here at the nursery in Sequim! We’re making this one a two-day event this time; you can still come Sunday but please schedule an appointment.

August 9. Fronderosa Frolic in Gold Bar. Haven’t heard from Judith yet, but assuming it’s on we’ll do it.

September 6. Heronswood garden open and sale, Kingston.

September 12 – 13. Northwest Horticultural Society Fall Sale in Seattle, not confirmed but probably doing it.

September 13. Salem Hardy Plant Society sale.

September 20. If we can, we’d like to try the HPSO Fall Plantfest (Portland). This is not confirmed.

September 26 – 27. Fall OPEN HOUSE here at the nursery in Sequim! We have pushed this one way back this year due to all the other weekends in September being full. We hope that by that time people will still have money left over for plants, and we may get a little rain by then putting people in the mood for planting. As with the summer open house this will be Friday and Saturday only.

If we can think up anything to do in October we’d like to do it. I wouldn’t mind adding an event in July or August also, if it were only one day. Ideas are welcome.

Also note that we will not be at Sorticulture this year. It was a great, fun event and we did not lose money, but it was not worth the logistical challenges. It was really tough to keep the nursery watered simultaneously with all the back and forth to Everett.

Despite the challenges, regional sales are a lot of fun because it is a chance for us to catch up with other nursery folks as well as customers who live too far away to visit us at the nursery. We hope you will come out to one (or several) of them and see us this year!

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Sequim Garden Show. Hey this looks like fun, right?

The Amazing Resilience of Trees

Happy New Year! It has been a while, but since I did a general business update last time, I think I will talk about something else today. There is not much exciting to report about December’s big freeze, as we weathered it without much damage; unless you call the major expense of heating three large greenhouses for a week “damage” which I just may. (Did I mention that this is a great time to order more plants?)

Of all the blog posts I have written here, the one that continues to get the most hits is this post about how to prune your leyland cypress. At the risk of stating the obvious, this tells me that a lot of folks are searching the internet for useful information about how to prune them. And they may be disappointed to find that I basically say not to bother planting them to start with if they are going to need pruning constantly. But I’ll stick by that statement because it still makes plenty of sense if you stop to think about it. Perhaps it also tells me that way too many people are planting leyland cypress.

But if you’re determined to keep your leyland, and really want to know how to prune it; well, I’ll tell you. You’re best off shearing them annually at minimum, preferably right before new growth starts in spring; and it’s best if you don’t cut into old wood. You don’t have to shear; individual pruning cuts will also work, but doing it that way may take longer, depending on your methods, equipment and the height of your plant(s). That is about all there is to it, I think.

I wanted to revisit those trees at Independent Bible Church because of a dire prediction I made; which was basically that, since someone cut way too much green material off of them, they would mostly be dead or in otherwise sorry shape by now. Well fortunately I am not always right about everything, and in this case the trees have proven exceptionally resilient. Mind you they have a lot going for them: they are in the perfect climate and they are on an irrigation system. I have to admit some of these trees actually look great and are now making a shapely screen just like they are supposed to. I took these pictures in September.

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Now some of the ones that were really chopped up still look ratty and probably always will. Because for most conifers, including these, you still can’t cut into old huge limbs and expect new growth to come out. The remarkable thing though is that none of these trees has actually died (except, of course, for the ones they removed entirely). Some of them probably lost 90% of their foliage but are still hanging on and trying to grow out of it. I have to admit I didn’t expect that.

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So there you go. No matter how much abuse trees are subjected to, they still do everything they can hang on. Aren’t trees amazing?

While we’re on the subject, I thought I’d revisit the trees at Carrie Blake Park, which I rather ungraciously dubbed as “hell for plants” in this blog post a couple years ago. I think I had good reason to be irked at the time, but things are looking much better there now.

If this is of interest to you, you may wish to go back and read the post I am referencing before going on. If I were really ambitious it would be nice to produce a side-by-side before and after comparison, but I did not always take the same pictures of the same trees, and certainly not from the same angle. Let’s go through some pictures I took last August.

Remember those sad garry oaks that had way too many of their lower branches pruned off of them? They actually look pretty nice now, for the most part.

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You can see where some of them did some serious resprouting along the trunk where branches had been removed.

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In some cases this was pruned off yet again, but at least they didn’t limb the trees up any farther. Also the maintenance folk seem to have missed a few of them. (Captions are below the photos from here on out.)

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Remember the oak that was pruned to just two branches? Here it is now, hanging on and looking better.

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The amur maples generally look pretty good; it seems they ought to be fine.

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The European birch, mysteriously enough, continues to hang on; and doesn’t look half bad.

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Here’s what became of that arborvitae hedge. It’s hard not to feel bad for whoever paid for all those arborvitaes. At least the ones that survived look decent now.

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I guess this thing is our native Ribes sanguineum. Eek. Perhaps not a total failure, but this doesn’t exactly get one excited about the beauty of native plants. There are better choices.

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Arctostaphylos x media, actually well adapted to the site, continues to flourish.

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Vaccinium ovatum continues to look about as dead as it always has. Sorry, I think it’s a bit too late for fresh mulch (and anyway bark isn’t the best).

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Likewise, kinnikkinnik continues to have problems at this site (though there is a decent patch or two, such as around the Vaccinium pictured above). OK, someone can remove this now.

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This site really has a lot of potential. Maybe I’ll have the chance to be involved here sometime.

This may (or may not – ha) lead me to a future blog post about the challenges municipalities face maintaining such landscapes or gardens, and a possible solution.

I’ll also provide an update on the low-impact garden at Carrie Blake Park this summer. I really doubt Agave ‘Blue Glow’ endured the drop to the upper teens that we had last December, but I haven’t gotten out there to check on it yet.

To Toot Our Own Horn

In what may be my briefest blog post in a while, if we’re lucky (and because I don’t have a lot of time), we will embark on a bit of shameless self-promotion.

First, I must call your attention to our mail-order catalog, where 46 new species have just been added to our list. Notable features include an assortment of new Arctostaphylos generally unavailable elsewhere (e-mail for availability first; we just sold out of a couple things), and an expanded selection of conifers. Astelias are back for the first time in years, and we have a few of the spectacular Protea punctata which seems to actually have a shot at being fairly hardy in sheltered Northwest gardens.

And, of course, there are lots more. Not everything we have just added to the list says “New Fall 2013″ as this designation applies only to plants that are truly new to our mail-order list, not those that have returned after being unavailable for a time.

Basically I am playing catch-up from all the plants I should have added over the summer. Oh well – better late than never. It is still a great time to plant, fall (despite a dramatic start) being far from over; and we would be thrilled to have your business to keep us going into what is usually the slow season for nurseries. I don’t know about you but our soil is nice and moist and ready for planting, even here in the rainshadow.

The big news however is that we are famous. During our September open house a group of very enthusiastic garden bloggers dropped by for a visit and quick tour. We were happy to welcome this group as they were serious plant nuts who had never seen our nursery before. In order to fully savor our new-found fame we must share the posts by these bloggers that included mention and generally favorable reviews of our nursery. We thank them for the visit and they are welcome back at any time.

The relevant links follow.
When You Come to the End of a Perfect Day; The Desert Northwest (The Outlaw Gardener)
Veni, vidi, WeHoP – a glorious garden geek adventure – part 2 (The Creative Flux)
And finally, The Desert Northwest… (Danger Garden)

Not directly related, but as long as I’m at it, Loree at Danger Garden (among the group of intrepid nursery hoppers) has also mentioned us in this post.

Finally, we wish to offer our sincere thanks to all of you who attended our open house, purchased from us at the Salem Hardy Plant Society Sale, or the NHS Fall Sale. I’m no economist but I have a hunch it would be a lot more difficult to run this nursery if no one ever bought anything. Drop me a line sometime and let us know how your plants are doing.

NEWSLETTER – September Open House and Sales! Featuring Conifers.

Greetings Friends Against Boring Plants,

September is here, and despite it still being summer, our fall rains have arrived early! And it looks like more is on the way this weekend. Of course we all know fall is a great time to plant, and that is especially true of early fall, and it is even more true in weather like this. We have been doing a little planting ourselves.

So here is what we have in the pipeline. This weekend is our final open house of the year! (Details/directions on our web site as always.) Then after that we have two regional sales coming up: The Salem Hardy Plant Society sale, Sept 14th in Salem, and the Northwest Horticultural Society sale, Sept 20-21st in Seattle. We welcome your special plant requests for either of these sales. After that, well, there is still mail-order, and you can always visit the nursery by appointment!

You hear often that “fall is a great time to plant,” but is it really true? Well, yes, in fact, it is. Studies have shown that many plants make more root growth in the fall than at other seasons. And we have certainly noticed that plants set in the ground or potted on in the fall have a great advantage in the next growing over those whose planting was delayed until early the following spring. Not only do they start growing faster and better, but they look greener and healthier too, with fewer physiological problems.

As we are highlighting different groups of plants with each open house event, I thought this time we would go with conifers. (Even if I have already mentioned some of these earlier.) They might not be listed on the web site yet, but we still have a few Juniperus maritima left. This is one of western Washington’s most special native plants, being found only in the ‘Salish Sea’ area and a few isolated pockets of the northeast Olympic Peninsula. A true relict from the Holocene warm period, this is a great drought tolerant, conical, small tree for the garden producing berries that attract the birds. It is uncommon in the wild and very hard to find in nurseries.

In the Juniper department, we also have an ever-increasing selection of Juniperus communis var. saxatilis forms from various places around the Northwest. This is a nice groundcover that grows slowly enough to be considered well-behaved. For something shrubbier, we also have an upright form of J. communis. And just in case you need something extremely drought tolerant that will keep the neighbors out, we have a few Juniperus oxycedrus. This Mediterranean species makes a big prickly tree! Just don’t plant it too close to anything else.

Getting back to rare and special Northwest native conifers, Taxus brevifolia, the Pacific yew, is a nice small tree that thrives in shade. It is easy to grow but slow, and with its glossy, dark needles I think it can look a bit exotic in the right spot. We also still have plenty of Modoc Cypress (Cupressus bakeri) in stock (small size only). This beautiful tree occurs farther north in the wild than any other Western Hemisphere cypress, and has fine, soft, grey foliage. Although easily hardy in Northwest gardens, it remains very rare. We have a few other rare Cypresses in stock too, like C. austro-tibetica and green Arizona cypress (C. arizonica subsp. arizonica).

Looking at a few more West Coast conifers, you can also find at our nursery Pinus jefferyi, which does great here and looks much like a Ponderosa. We also have a new crop of the deep green and vigorous Cupressus pygmaea and the beautiful C. macrocarpa ‘Donard Gold’. And we have just a few of the very rare Torreya californica, a yew-like tree with long sharp needles that can eventually reach quite a large size!

Port Orford Cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) remains a great choice for well-drained Pacific Northwest gardens. We carry an excellent large-growing blue form of it as well as the fabulous upright cultivar ‘Blue Surprise’. If you want to try something different we also have some little starts of ‘Chilworth Silver’.

The beautiful Chilean conifers Podocarpus salignus and Prumnopitys andina remain available in ample quantities, as does Fitzroya cupressoides, the “Patagonian redwood” which can live longer than 1,000 years! Some other fun Southern Hemisphere conifers in stock would include the golden totara, Podocarpus totara ‘Aurea’ from New Zealand, and the weeping Tasmanian Huon pine, Lagarostrobos franklinii. We also have an exciting form of Afrocarpus falcatus that has proven hardy at the J. C. Raulston Arboretum in North Carolina. This is usually regarded as a houseplant in our climate but why not try it outside?

In the smaller Podocarpus department, we continue to have plenty of Podocarpus lawrencei ‘Purple King’ with its beautiful purple winter color, as well as P. alpinus ‘Red Tip’, and the plain green form of P. alpinus, and P. nivalis which makes a nice little groundcover.

Finally I shall mention a couple of Asian conifers: Podocarpus macrophyllus, which is often sold as a houseplant though it is actually completely hardy outdoors in the Northwest. With its huge strappy leaf-ish “needles” it hardly even looks like a conifer. And Cephalotaxus harringtonia is a fun plant with a tiered branching habit and dark green needles. It does great in the shade, and both of these will appreciate summer water.

That’s all for now. Thanks for reading, and we hope to see you soon!
Ian & Co.
The Desert Northwest
PO Box 3475
Sequim, WA 98382
mail@desertnorthwest.com

http://www.desertnorthwest.com

New Low Impact Garden in Sequim

Before I get to the subject at hand, allow me to interject a brief commercial announcement. This Saturday we will be at the Fronderosa Frolic in Gold Bar with lots of other exciting nurseries! As usual, your special requests are welcome. Please note the event is only ONE DAY this year. This might be the region’s geekiest plant sale. Maybe we will get some thunderstorms. That would be exciting. See you there! Woohoo! And such. OK, moving along now. . .

I recently learned of this new “low impact” garden that has been installed at Sequim’s Carrie Blake Park (here and here). So I thought I had better go check it out and see what I think, since “low impact” and “water wise” are pretty much what we are about (along with excellent plantsmanship) here at the Desert Northwest.

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I ought to preface this post by noting that I had no idea any of this was going on until I read about it in the Sequim Gazette online. Some of our local nurseries donated plants to this project, but we were not contacted. I suppose that means there are a lot of people here in the area who still don’t know about our nursery. Well, we are not in a prominently visible location, which you will know if you have been here.

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The garden area is divided into several different sections, which I didn’t figure out until the end since I started at the “wrong” end of the garden and missed the interpretive sign. The larger part of the area consists of “open prairie” and “woodland” plantings. There are also demonstration rain gardens, seashore gardens and a rock garden.

I am glad they have the rock garden. Rock gardening is kind of a big deal when it comes to combining low-maintenance with plantsmanship. It is tempting to think of rock gardening as a dying fad for eccentric old geezers, as I (dare I admit) once did. I have been slow to get into it because of the amount of time and skill it takes to place the rocks. But there is certainly a such thing as a garden that combines the best of rock gardening and low maintenance.

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This rock garden was small but had a decent selection of plants. It will be interesting to see how the Agaves (A. montana and A. ‘Blue Glow’) do. It is great that someone thought to try them, but I would have started with A. parryi, and I would have started with at least a 2-gallon plant or nothing at all, since smaller sizes just don’t always make it through their first winter. But hey – maybe we’ll get lucky with these; you never know. The manzanita at the corner of the garden (left side of pic above) was not labeled as to species, but looks like probably a form of A. densiflora which means it will get way too big for the space, and grow into the parking lot and halfway over the rock garden if it is not cut back or eventually removed. Oh well.

I thought the rain garden was well done given the limitations of the space. I only wonder if enough water will run into there to sustain the plants that are supposed to benefit from the runoff. Time will tell, I guess.

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It is hard to say how the rest of the garden will look until it fills out, so I guess I won’t say much yet. Most of these plants are very small, and one gets the feeling that availability of source material was a major limitation when doing this project. That doesn’t surprise me. Conventional nurseries in our region continue to be pretty out of touch when it comes to offering plants that really like to live in our climate without getting irrigated all summer.

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A Madrona. Well that’s good.

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One can hardly go wrong with beach strawberry. As long as you keep it out of the rock garden!

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Calocedrus is another good choice. This one looks a bit stressed out, but ought to make it.

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Lots of kinnikkinnik here. One has to be cautious with it in our climate, I think, because of the prevailing availability of inferior clones like ‘Massachusetts’ that can burn in hotter gardens and aren’t as tough as people expect. ‘Point Reyes’ is probably the best selection for Northwest dry gardens.

Conceptually, I like this garden: it is something I can get behind. The different areas are well thought out. The careful planning, consideration and work that went into it is very much evident. The billboards are loaded with good information and even talk about how dry it is in the Olympic rainshadow.

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Here, we have a hose bib. Leading to. . .

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. . .a sprinkler. Oh well. It would be better to hand-water the plants to get them to grow deep root systems, but it is probably too many plants for that to be realistic. You can do it with a sprinkler too as long as it only comes on once every week or two.

To me the weakest link is simply plant material. I can’t imagine the full spectrum of plants that was desired was incorporated here (if it was, I have a lot more educating to do about drought tolerant plants for our climate. HINT: very few of them are available at most nurseries). I don’t know what their plant budget was, and it sounds like many items were donated; but my approach would have been to specify what plants were needed beforehand and have someone contract-grow most of them (as my first budget priority), excepting a few things that are readily available. I imagine a low impact garden in the Northwest being full of Callistemons, Grevilleas, Leptospermums, Olearias, a vast array of species Penstemons, Artemisias, Garrya, Baccharis, Yuccas, ice plants, other hardy cacti and succulents, and many more kinds of Cistus, Ceanothus and manzanita; to start with.

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A Cistus. It’s doing splendidly – so why just two of them in the whole project?

I (cautiously) mention budget priorities in relation to plant selection because I think it is important to “wow” people before they are interested enough in a project like this to want to be informed about it through brochures, signage, etc. A lot of people aren’t going to be motivated to try something different if they aren’t immediately impressed. I guess I just don’t want anyone to get the idea that low impact gardens are boring or visually underwhelming. I don’t want anyone to feel like a compromise is involved when aiming to conserve water in your garden. There are thousands of drought tolerant plants out there that are suited to our climate, and a water-wise garden can look like a lot of different things.

If, on the other hand, the goal of this project was to get people to use plants that are already easy to find in the nursery trade, then we have a bigger problem: nurseries, largely, aren’t growing the right plants for our region. This sounds like a fine topic for another blog post. And I am now sounding like a broken record.

I hope this review has come off as well balanced and not too scathing. I get it that these plants are not easy to find: it can be a major challenge, but not impossible. I also get it that funding was limited.

So with all that in mind, I wish to let anyone who reads this know that I am happy to contribute plants to this project, or similar projects in the future, especially if they are close to home here in Sequim. That includes both donations (subject to current availability and within reasonable limits) and competitively priced contract growing for specialty items. I’m here. But you still have to find my web site and blog: I just don’t want to seem like a pushy sort of person, I guess.

NEWSLETTER: Weekend Open House featuring New Zealand and Chilean Plants!!

Fellow Heroes of Horticulture,

It’s a spectacular summer and this weekend comes our summer open house! As usual the details and directions are posted on our web site.

Hey, we’re actually having a real summer this year, and by the end of it, you are certain to be tired of watering, if you aren’t already. It’s time to start planning NOW to make your garden more drought resistant with plants that are easy to grow and don’t need a lot of water! Yeah, I know, I am probably preaching to the choir.

It doesn’t look like I will get a chance to update the web list before this weekend (here and here), so allow me to highlight some of the more exciting plants we have that are available for purchase and look great now! However, the web list is very nearly still up to date – we haven’t sold out of much in the last two months. I probably need to add a few things to the list soon, which may explain why some of the plants I am about to tempt you with are not listed on the web site.

Our New Zealand and Chilean plant sections are looking particularly good this summer, in terms of both selection and quality! Plants from both regions are very well adapted here, since central Chile and New Zealand are at approximately the same latitude as we are, and with a strongly maritime climate similar to ours. Central Chile even has a summer dry period like ours, while New Zealand plants are frequently adapted to gritty soils and tough enough to take our summer drought without any help once established, or nearly so, depending on the soil/site. In any case, New Zealand plants are perfect for Northwest gardens that are close to salt water.

Among the best New Zealand plants for Northwest gardens are the Olearias. These daisy shrubs are fun and easy to grow and many of them reward the gardener with showy white flowers, which are fragrant on some species (notably O. x haastii) and may appear in late summer when little else in blooming (O. x haastii and O. avicennifolia). We have many of these to choose from now, in a variety of sizes from 4” on up to 5 gallon for O. macrodonta and O. avicennifolia. Other Olearias in our selection occur the huge-growing O. traversiorum, fine-textured O. lineata and O. solandri, and well-behaved grey-leafed shrubs O. x mollis and O. moschata – lots of options!

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The fragrant Olearia x haastii putting on a show in late July.

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Olearia macrodonta, a spring bloomer, with Phormiums.

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Olearia x mollis putting on a show in a planting bed with Phormium and others.

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Olearia avicennifolia blooming in August!

Check out this cool picture. That’s Hymenanthera crassifolia, which we don’t have our own image of yet. Evergreen and drought tolerant, with LOADS of shiny purple fruit, it’s pretty great! This is one of those plants that no one ever buys because they don’t know what it does. But now you have no excuse. We also have H. alpina, which has narrower leaves.

Some New Zealand plants have strongly divaricate juvenile foliage, thought to be an adaptation to prevent grazing by moas, which is pretty fun. Corokia cotoneaster is the well-known example, but we also have the much larger-growing Aristotelia fruticosa available now, and a hardy form of Leptospermum scoparium, the New Zealand Tea Tree (which isn’t strictly divaricate, but has similarly tiny, tough leaves).

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Divaricate growth habit of Corokia cotoneaster.

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Leptospermum scoparium, the source of tea tree oil.

Everyone seems to have forgotten about Hebes (technically Veronicas) for some reason – perhaps because too many of the tender varieties were marketed and then wiped out in recent cold winters, and now people are afraid to try all of them. Yet, as the discriminating gardener will note, the numerous hardy species that remain are still excellent garden plants, requiring little care and always looking great. Try Hebe ‘Blue Mist’, with conspicuous blue flowers; ‘Quicksilver’, which has tiny silvery leaves, or ‘Western Hills’, a nice mounding shrub with greyish foliage and white flowers.

And I’ll just mention a couple other New Zealand odds and ends. Astelias are very cool – like silvery Phormiums, and they are hardy in the Northwest (except frost pockets) once established if they are provided really good drainage: a scree garden is ideal. We now offer the spectacular A. chathamica and the red-tinted A. nervosa ‘Westland’. Podocarpus totara ‘Aurea’ is a small coniferous tree with foliage that is bright gold in full sun. Also we now have, for the first time in years, Carmichaelia australis, one of the elusive New Zealand ‘tree brooms’; though this one is more of a shrub, at least it is hardy!

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Astelia chathamica looking fine, and this picture was taken after a hard freeze.

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Podocarpus totara ‘Aurea’

Let’s take a look at a few exciting Chilean plants. We seem to have a whole lot of Azaras right now. These plants are wonderful evergreen shrubs or small trees with flowers that are either showy, fragrant, or both. They are moderately drought-resistant and don’t mind being in either sun or partial shade. Our current selection includes, in a variety of sizes, A. microphylla, A. microphylla ‘Variegata’, A. dentata, A. aff. uruguayensis, A. lanceolata, A. petiolaris, and A. serrata – more than you will find anywhere, probably! (I’m not sure how that happened.)

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Azara lanceolata blooming in April in Seattle. I bet you never knew Azara could be this showy – it looks like an Acacia!

Luma and Eucryphia continue to look great with a good selection to choose from. These are evergreen large shrubs or small trees with showy white flowers, which again are very easy to grow, unfussy, and moderately tolerant of dry conditions once established. We have L. apiculata and E. nymanensis ‘Nymansay’ in about any size you could want, but also a good stock of L. chequen, and a selected hardy form of L. apiculata, as well as Eucryphia x intermedia and the rather rare, small-leafed E. x hybrida.

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Eucryphia x nymansensis blooming prolifically in August in Bremerton. Bees love the flowers!

In the ‘odds and ends’ department, Aristotelia chilensis is looking great. This very vigorous and easy shrub produces tasty edible fruit that is attractive to birds. Gunnera magellanica is a cute little groundcover with glossy green leaves suitable for a moderately moist spot in the garden. And if cute things aren’t your cup of tea, Dasyphyllum diacanthoides is a giant tree-sized daisy relative that gets 60′ tall and has spiny leaves.

Finally, Chile has a number of exciting conifers, like the rare Fitzroya cupressoides (Patagonian cypress), which we have in plenty in 1 gallon pots. Prumnopitys andina and Podocarpus salignus are two beautiful Chilean conifers in the Podocarpaceae family with a soft texture and very graceful habit of growth; also available now in a variety of sizes.

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Beautiful new weeping foliage on Podocarpus salignus. I think I just posted this a couple months ago on my blog, but hey, it’s such a great plant that one more time won’t hurt!

And as long as we’re talking conifers, I’ll mention a few hard-to-find Northwest natives we have in stock now. Cupressus bakeri (Modoc Cypress) is a very special native tree from the Siskyous that does great here in a dry spot. Juniperus maritima is a very special native of the ‘Salish Sea’ area that is rarely available. We also have Cupressus pygmaea from Northern California, and a local collection of Taxus brevifolia (Pacific Yew). Hurry and buy them all so I don’t have to put them on the web site – ha ha.

Well if you have read this far, your level of plant-geekiness is certainly sufficient to make a visit to the Desert Northwest this weekend, or any time really, a rewarding trip. Learning from last year, we have tried to schedule the summer open house for a weekend when not much else is going on in Sequim. The weather promises to cool off just enough not to be blasting hot in our greenhouses – so it ought to be perfect. Thanks for reading and we hope to see you soon!

Ian & Co.
The Desert Northwest
PO Box 3475
Sequim, WA 98382
mail@desertnorthwest.com

http://www.desertnorthwest.com

NEWSLETTER: Desert Northwest Open this weekend, new plant list, and more!

Dear Gardening Friends,

That was some summer we had earlier this month, wasn’t it? Who knows, perhaps we’ll get another one later on. Here in Sequim we finally managed to accumulate 5 inches of precipitation for the year to date, just last week. We have a few patches of brown grass from the hot spell but seem to have narrowly escaped the impending summer severe-dry-out for the time being.

We write to remind you of our Open House event this coming weekend, May 31st and June 1st ONLY! Sorry to capitalize ONLY, but we just really want to make sure no one shows up on the 2nd and has to leave disappointed. As was the case last year, the front 3/4 of greenhouses 2 and 3 will be open for shopping, as well as the west side of the shade house, and a selection of plants sitting outside on tables and pallets. We remind you that it is very helpful to come with a list of what you are looking for, as many plants are unlabeled (but we make sure you leave with labels); and that payment is by cash or check only. We continue to add more signage but there is still a lot of cool stuff tucked away out there that doesn’t have a sign. Check out our open house page for details, and directions to the nursery.

Speaking of lists, just in time for the open house, our retail plant list is now up to date! These are the relatively larger (1 gallon and up) sizes that are not usually available mail-order, though we do bring them to regional sales. Check it out: if you want it, we have it; but quantities may be limited so it’s first come, first served!

You can also shop from the mail-order list while you are here. This is quite up to date as well. I have a few more things to add but it is pretty darn close right now. So, yay. Let me just emphasize again that making a list of what you want before you come out really helps! Especially those little mail-order sizes, which can be hard to find (though we are here to help).

Of course it follows that if you just want to order something in the mail, you can be reasonably confident that the web site closely reflects actual availability at this point. Not only have I been busy adding plants; I have also added 60 pictures to the plant catalog in the last month. You can imagine we are very proud of ourselves for being quite on top of our game at the moment, as far as the web site is concerned.

If I may highlight a couple of exciting plants new to the list, we now have three groundcover banksia species! These are next to impossible to find; and, coming from Western Australia, they are not difficult to grow and are content in pots where not hardy. We have also selected some good new forms of Arctostaphylos x media we think are promising as garden plants, and a really nice-looking A. patula x nevadensis hybrid from the Columbia Gorge area, which may be its first introduction to cultivation. Gardeners in cold climates will be interested in our continuing good selection of species Penstemons, rare conifers like Modoc cypress (Hesperocyparis bakeri), and an interior collection of Garry oak (Quercus garryana).

If you’re not able to attend the open house, you can also find us at Sorticulture in Everett, where we will be from June 7 – 9. Check their web site for more details on that.

One more note: if you are not too far from Olympia, and don’t feel like a drive to Sequim is in the cards for the weekend, why not stop by Steamboat Island Nursery for their CHANGE OF DIRECTION plant sale (8424 Steamboat Island Road, Olympia, WA 98502). The nursery has not been open for retail for a long time, and Laine would certainly be grateful for your support. Or better yet, you could visit us and them both: what better way to spend a weekend than running around chasing after plants? (Don’t answer that.)

And one really final note: You Portland folks have the amazing good fortune that Xera Plants will be opening a retail location at 1114 SE Clay, Portland, OR 97214. The first day of business will be June 6th followed by a grand opening party on the 8th! You can read more about that here and here. If I were down there I wouldn’t want to miss it!

OK, I’m done now. Thanks for reading, and we hope to see you soon!
Ian & Co.
The Desert Northwest
PO Box 3475
Sequim, WA 98382
mail@desertnorthwest.com
http://www.desertnorthwest.com

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