NEWSLETTER: Desert Northwest Open House This Weekend!

Dear Plant People,

This weekend, the first official weekend of summer, we will hold our first open house of the year here at the Desert Northwest (Friday-Saturday, 9:30 to 5:30; click here for map and directions). More on that in a minute. But first, a silly story by Ian Barclay. Once upon a time I had the wild idea to sell some plants in British Columbia. I grew all these nice plants and they look great. I put them in the back of greenhouse 4 where they could grow and flourish until it was time to deliver them in early June. Then I scheduled the first open house of the season relatively late this year, so that those plants would be out of the way and people could shop without tripping on them.

The “funny” part is that getting those plants across an international border is quite an involved process; and, for some reason, the plants are still sitting there, looking more wonderful than ever. So when you go into greenhouse 4 you will see them in the back, all roped off. Oh well. I’m not giving up on getting them to BC, and they may still make it in a week or two; but if it doesn’t work, I’ll have a lot of really nice plants for the August open house and for fall sales!

Besides that we are in our usual recovery-from-spring mode. That means the nursery is not looking nearly as good as we would like it to, but it is not so bad that I feel like I need to cancel the open house. So I guess that means you’d better come on out and find some cool plants this weekend! Did you ever want a Eucalyptus regnans, the world’s tallest non-coniferous tree? This is your chance to get one—we only have a few left!

Did you know that when a plant goes on to the noxious weed list, only that particular species listed is a noxious weed, and not all of its relatives? That’s why we have in the past sold plants like Buddleja coriacea and Hedera colicha ‘Variegata’, and the reason you can buy things like ornamental hawthorns with pink flowers in nurseries. However not everyone seems to get this: some believe that if a plant is bad then all of its friends must be bad. We say no, that’s wrong. On that note this is your chance to get some fine Tamarix parviflora plants in 1 and 2 gallon pots. They have an amazing texture and the spring flowers are quite spectacular covering the whole plant. They were quite a hit at the Grays Harbor Garden Show in Elma but we still have some nice ones left.

What’s evergreen, aromatic, always looks great, grows almost anywhere, and the deer don’t eat it? I’m not telling you: you’ll have to come over this weekend and find out! Ha ha ha. OK, fine, I’ll tell you. Because you should know. Leptospermums, commonly called tea trees, fit the above criteria, and the hardier species are really excellent performers in our region. You just can’t beat the soft-textured foliage and white flowers. And yes they will grow most anywhere including heavy clay soils and coastal exposure. We still have quite a few left of various kinds, including the silvery and showy L. cunninghamii and large-growing L. ‘Eugene Hardy’. And don’t forget the groundcover L. humifusum which looks great now in the 4 inch size.

In the odd plants department, I bet you’ve always wanted a Furcraea parmentieri. It’s an enormous yuccoid plant that grows 8′ wide with a massive trunk. At maturity (which takes quite a few years) it sends up a 35′ tall flower spike and then dies. Unfortunately it’s only hardy to around 20 degrees so you’ll have to keep it in your 35′ tall private conservatory. Equally not-hardy is the southeast Australian Banksia serrata, with its saw-toothed leaves and big orange to yellow flowers. Although we grow these plants to tempt people with sheltered gardens, Cliff Mass thinks winters are gradually getting less extreme (check this out), so there’s that. On the other hand, a plant that DOES show good hardiness is Araucaria angustifolia: the one I planted in Olympia in 1998 must be close to 35′ tall. We just have a few of them left at $24 each in band pots.

And some of you will be wondering about the Arctostaphylos (manzanita) and Grevillea supply. There are some 1 gallons out there but the little pots are more numerous and look better. Looking particularly good right now would be the silvery groundcover Arctostaphylos ‘Pacific Mist’, as well as the taller A. pajaroensis and the outstanding A. bakeri ‘Louis Edmonds’ with its pink flowers and (when older) smooth purple trunks. In the Grevillea department G. ‘Poorinda Leane’ (a staple here) and G. miqueliana may be found, as well as the nearly ever-blooming G. ‘Audrey’ which has returned after a long absence from our availability. (Seriously it blooms 10 – 11 months out of the year!)

At this time I had best stop writing and start working. Thanks for reading and may your gardens prosper!

Ian

The Desert Northwest

mail@desertnorthwest.com

http://www.desertnorthwest.com

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