NEWSLETTER: Open House time again at the Desert Northwest!

Greetings Hortophiles,

This weekend once again we will have our mid-summer open house, which will be on Friday and Saturday only! Please come out and buy everything so I don’t have to pot it up again. I’m just kidding; that’s all part of the fun. As always, directions and a map are found here. We are glad that, just in time, the weather will be cooling off back into the 70’s, so it will be possible to walk into the greenhouses without melting.

What exciting goodies will we find at the open house? Well this time I am so organized that I have just completed a new inventory of ALL the nursery stock that is for sale. You will find appended to this e-mail (assuming I remember to do it right) not one, but two documents; one of which shows our current availability in the mail-order department (generally smaller stock in 4” pots) and the other one showing “specimen” plants which means those in the 1-gallon and larger sizes. [Note: this is not yet available to blog readers unless you e-mail me; sorry. Working on it!] Of course the next challenge is to get all this stuff on the web site, but hey, at least we know what is out there and available.

This is the time of year when we are reminded how much easier gardening is when water-wise plants are used. It is super dry out there and our soil (where not irrigated) is basically powdery dust with rocks in it. Still, there is nothing wrong with planting now if you dig a proper watering basin and keep new plants watered. (We would be glad to show you what one of those looks like.) Our established plantings of things like Arctostaphylos, certain Ceanothus and Luma are looking great with no water at all, as well as a few surprises like Cassinia vauvilliersii var albida which we can’t say enough good things about. Interestingly, plants such as some of the hardy Grevilleas and Leptospermums seem a bit “on the edge” of drought tolerance here in Sequim, at least on our soil; but for most of you about anywhere else in western Washington they are good performers with no irrigation. We will continue experimenting further with those.

Looking particularly good right now are a couple of Southern Hemisphere butterfly bushes, B. araucana from Chile and B. loricata from South Africa. Both are hardy here and look quite similar to each other, having attractive pale gray leaves and white flowers. We also have a really nice crop of Eucryphia x nymansensis in two gallon pots that are vigorous and look outstanding. This Eucryphia is one of the few trees that puts on a show of big white flowers in late summer! It is evergreen and bees love it.

We ought to mention that groundcover Banksias have returned after a long absence, which are in the 4” pot size for this year. These rather bizarre plants creep along the ground sending thick leaves straight up into the air. Once they reach a certain size, conspicuous inflorescences emerge straight up from ground level around the periphery of the plant! B. blechnifolia, gardneri, petiolaris and repens all fit into this category. Native to Western Australia, they can handle some frost but are not quite cold-hardy here (low 20s generally), but they are fun to try in a sheltered spot or in a pot. B. repens is probably the best for cold tolerance, but B. blechnifolia has the coolest leaves. Beyond that there is not a whole lot new in the Proteaceae department right now, although we do have a modest crop of Protea subvestita in production.

We might also call your attention to a short list of bamboos at the end of the specimen plant list, most of which are clump-formers that do not invade. We do not claim that bamboos are terribly drought tolerant, in general; except the Chusqueas which are pretty tough. But they are interesting and useful plants that are fun to grow, and we continue to propagate and offer a few of the best ones from our collection. Although we are not shipping bamboos, we think our prices compare favorably with places like the long-established Bamboo Garden in Portland, being at least 10 – 20% below their prices.

Finally I should mention something we haven’t grown in years, and which we will admit have nothing to do with the desert or being water-wise. That would be the REAL Gunnera manicata, which is now in stock, and I have to say “the real” because most plants sold as G. manicata are actually G. chilensis. G. chilensis is still cool but a little less exciting: G. manicata has 9′ wide leaves rather than just 5′ wide leaves! So you don’t want to miss your chance to get one—as long as you have a place for it that gets plenty of water! Half shade is about right.

That’s all for now. If you can make it, we look forward to seeing you this weekend!

Ian

The Desert Northwest

mail@desertnorthwest.com

http://www.desertnorthwest.com

IMG_7015

Gunnera manicata at Chetzemoka Park, Port Townsend

 

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