Desert Northwest Last Open House of The Year, This Weekend!

Dear Hortfolk,

We hope you and your garden have survived a summer of even-drier-than-usual drought and annoying fire smoke, which we are glad to apparently have behind us. Since you still don’t have enough plants, we would invite you to come and see us this weekend for the final open house of the year, here at the nursery in Sequim. The hours for this event are, according to our usual habit, from 9:30 to 5:30 Friday and Saturday (directions here). Shop from an array of interesting water-wise plants all locally produced by us, here on site!

Now usually we would call this the “fall open house,” but it seems that in the official sense summer will actually linger through part of the weekend. Whatever. The calendar may say summer has a couple days left; but the weather, unlike last year at this time, is making it feel like summer was over a while ago. That’s fine by us though, and I think most of us are glad for the change. We can even see fresh snow near the summit of Gray Wolf Peak (7,200′) which is visible from the nursery. (Speaking of which, I need to get up there sometime and see what is growing at the top!)

This summer we have been salvaging a selection of hardy cacti and succulents from a garden in Rock Island, whose owner plans to sell and is concerned the new owners won’t appreciate being in a house surrounded by prickly things. (I can’t imagine, but hey.) So if you visit this weekend, you may see us in the process of “assembling” a really fabulous cactus bed which will probably not be finished until sometime next week. The end result should be exciting. All these plants are totally hardy, but the question is whether they can survive a (relatively) wet winter having lost much of their root systems in transplanting. We will know by spring!

Now to tell you of some really exciting plants that we have grown just for you. You probably got our availability list in the August newsletter so we won’t send that again, as little has changed. This is an excellent chance for you to get a Eucalyptus neglecta. Despite the somewhat disparaging botanical name this is a great plant. It has big round leaves on square stems that smell strongly of, well, eucalyptus. (Imagine that.) Unlike some eucalypts this species makes rather dense shade, and may be considered a good fast-growing and very unique broadleaf evergreen shade tree. It is very cold hardy and our trees were grown from a tree I planted 16 years ago that has never been damaged by cold. (A 21 year old E. neglecta also grows there, which has also never been damaged.) Oh, did I mention the new growth is purple? No joke. Yes it is pretty cool, and, we think, rather hard to find in nurseries lately.

We also have lots of the purple form of Leptospermum lanigerum, which may look a bit underwhelming right now as we have had it under shade cloth, but turns a nice shade of purple out in the sun. (Should have moved them outside before the open house, oh well.) Eucryphia x nymansensis is looking fabulous, as is a nice crop of Arctostaphylos pajaroensis in little pots. This seems to be one of the easier manzanitas to grow in the garden as well as in containers, but for some reason doesn’t get the same attention as popular manzanitas like ‘Howard McMinn’ and ‘Sunset’. Also Gunnera manicata is still available, because G. chilensis isn’t big enough, we had to grow the really big one! Because who doesn’t have room in their garden for a plant with 9′ wide leaves? This one needs water though so watch out for that.

What happens when someone puts a trademark name on a wild-collected plant, such as one of the South African hardy ice plants? Well first of all people who care about integrity in naming plants get slightly annoyed. It would have been better to market it as a selected form of a known species. The main result is that it is still fine to sell the plant, but it cannot be sold under the trademark name. So you have nurseries such as Plant Delights selling it as Delosperma ‘Fiore Spinner’ (note spelling), and we are selling it as Delosperma ‘Spinner of Fire.’ We’ll leave it to you to guess what the trademark name of this plant is. And no, we’re not being naughty: only plants of cultivated origin may be patented. It is unfortunate that the way people use trademarks results in this mess. You’ll want to check out this cute succulent groundcover with conspicuously yellow-centered red flowers. It’s even blooming now!

I will stop there. If you can’t make it to the open house, we thank you for your past business, and hope we all have a great winter!

Ian Barclay
The Desert Northwest
PO Box 3475
Sequim, WA 98382
http://www.desertnorthwest.com/
mail@desertnorthwest.com

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. David Lyman
    Sep 20, 2018 @ 19:26:28

    Ian,

    Are any of the Protea subvestita ready for sale?

    Thanks.

    David Lyman

    Sent from my iPad

    Reply

  2. Ian
    Dec 04, 2018 @ 22:32:11

    Hi David, Sorry, just noticed your message. They are about an inch and 1/2 tall. We’ll hope for more growth on them in the spring.

    Reply

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